The White House and the Prostitute

The Voyeur in Repose: A History of American Scandals and the People Scaring Them Off the Screen

by Paul A. Cappiello

The book begins in New Orleans, where a scandal involving a “Voyeur in Repose,” a French prostitute of questionable reputation whom the local police department had been trying to entice from Louisiana, had finally reached the White House.

In the wake of this scandal, a scandal of sexual misconduct and other indiscretions—the scandal has been so far limited to a few prostitutes and a few politicians—which had begun in New Orleans, had spread to Washington, D.C., and other metropolitan areas, and had also reached the White House. The alleged affair between a U.S. president and a foreign prostitute brought into question the ethical conduct of U.S. federal officials. The scandal had come to light only after a number of women had come forward to accuse President William McKinley of sexual misconduct. The White House was in a tizzy. The scandal had reached the White House, and President McKinley in order to quell the growing uproar was forced to resign his position as leader of the U.S. Senate because of his involvement as a partner in the adulterous affair. The scandal had reached the White House, and President McKinley, in order to quell the growing uproar, was forced to resign his position as leader of the U.S. Senate because of his involvement in the adulterous affair. This had been only the first of what was planned to be a number of scandals, and the White House was already in a tizzy. These scandals reached the White House, and President McKinley, in order to quell the emerging scandal, was forced to resign his position as leader of the U.S. Senate because of his involvement in the adulterous affair. To quell the growing uproar, President McKinley made it a point to resign from all his positions. The affair was, and still is, in court. The affair was, and still is, in court. The affair was, and still is, in court. President McKinley had taken it to the White House with him when he left office. The affair was, and still is, in court. The affair was, and still is, in court. President Roosevelt and his wife, who had once been in a relationship with Mrs. McKinley, were accused in court of being unfaithful to one another. The affair was

Leave a Comment