The Good News is That The Nation’s Governors Already Have a Vision for How to Respond to the Climate Emergency

Nicholas Goldberg: Americans don’t care about climate change. Here’s how to wake them up.

In this image released by the National Park Service, a small family group sits along the edge of the water in a small cove in the park in Redding, Calif., Friday, Dec. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/National Park Service) (The Associated Press)

In this image released by the National Park Service, a small family group sits along the edge of the water in a small cove in the park in Redding, Calif., Friday, Dec. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/National Park Service) (The Associated Press)

In this image released by the National Park Service, a small family group sits along the edge of the water in a small cove in the park in Redding, Calif., Friday, Dec. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/National Park Service) (The Associated Press)

In this image released by the National Park Service, a small family group sits along the edge of the water in a small cove in the park in Redding, Calif., Friday, Dec. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/National Park Service) (The Associated Press)

(RNS) — American politics has moved on. But the country’s leaders still lack the will to reform its broken environmental-protection system.

The good news is that the nation’s governors already have at least a glimmer of a vision for how to respond to the climate emergency while protecting the economy and protecting human health.

The bad news is that they have been unable to rally a majority of their legislatures and governors to bring the plan to fruition.

But that doesn’t mean it isn’t worth trying.

“The political climate right now is an ideal time for trying to take on the climate problem,” said Bill McKibben, the founder of 350.org, in an interview with The Daily Signal.

“The science says we are well within the next 10 years to really have to deal with the problem. And it will absolutely transform how the US economy operates; it will probably transform how our lives.”

The nation’s leaders haven’t acted. But they could — and should — if they get behind the idea being floated by 16 of the largest

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