Marina del Rey Beach Closed for Sewage Overflow

Sewage spill prompts beach closure in Marina del Rey

Updated

Marina del Rey beachgoers could be without a view from their piers as a sewage leak from the city’s water treatment plant has prompted the closure of most of the city’s beaches.

There were no major impacts from the Sewage Overflow, or SOW, on city beaches, such as the beaches at Marina del Rey, where the SOW was reported on Thursday.

But the SOW was reported on some city beaches early Thursday morning, including the Marina del Sol at about 5:30am.

The Sewage Overflow was first reported in the vicinity of the Santa Fe Depot, according to the California Water Commission.

City officials have not yet been able to determine how much water was lost from the plant over the past few days, and city engineers are working to ensure the water is cleared of pollutants before the beaches reopen.

In a prepared statement, Marina del Rey spokeswoman Christine Maples said city workers have been working at the plant since the SOW and are monitoring the plant.

“In the meantime, city workers are taking precautions to keep the public as safe as possible and to ensure that no water intrusion into the ocean occurs,” she said.

Marina del Rey lifeguard Sgt. Tim Gossard said the closure of the city’s beach is not expected to affect swimming or kayaking. He advised that beachgoers should not travel to the beaches.

Marina del Rey lifeguard Sgt. Tim Gossard said the closure of the city’s beach is not expected to affect swimming or kayaking. He advised that beachgoers should not travel to the beaches. (Chris O’Meara/ Los Angeles Times)

The city’s beaches, which host approximately 90 percent of the city’s tourists, were closed for the public’s safety.

The other 10 percent of the city’s beachgoers — those not on city property — are allowed to continue to use the city’s beach and pools.

A marina del sol water filter station in Marina del Rey is cleaned after a sewage overflow caused by a broken pipe at the city’s water treatment plant on Thursday, April 5, 2014. (Davidaxsonson / AP)

Water treatment plants are operated by the Municipal Water District of Los Angeles and its constituent agencies in the California,

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